South Korea News

Başlatan Sabri Ünal, Eki 28, 2015, 10:27 ÖS

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Saab to Support S Korean KF-X Fighter Jet's AESA Radar Development


Saab has received an order for support of algorithm development and evaluation of airborne AESA radar for South Korea's indigenous KF-X fighter jet.

The radar development programme is led by the Korean Agency for Defence Development (ADD) and Saab will work in cooperation with ADD and its contractual partner LIG Nex1. The order value is MSEK 125 (US$25 million).

The Republic of Korea has a long-term ambition to develop a domestic fighter aircraft, including relevant avionic equipment such as AESA radar. For Saab, the present contract is an important milestone, and shows that Saab is an important partner in the longer term for Republic of Korean authorities and industry.

"We are proud to be part of the airborne AESA radar development program. This further proves our position as the leading provider and partner to develop the latest fighter aircraft technology and sub systems", says Anders Carp, head of Saab's business area Surveillance. "One of our objectives is to partner with Republic of Korean industry and government to support the development of a domestic fighter".

LIG Nex1 Co. Ltd. is based in Seoul and develops and produces a wide range of advanced precision electronic systems.

Seoul was developing its locally-made fighter jet, initially named as KF-X, with support from Lockheed Martin but the US government denied it four critical technologies including that of the AESA radar. The AAD then vowed to develop the technologies on its own.

South Korea has roped in Indonesia as a partner in the KF-X fighter jet program in which the latter is to fund a part of the program in exchange for the rights to manufacture some of the aircraft.

http://www.defenseworld.net/news/21613/Saab_to_Support_S_Korean_KF_X_Fighter_Jet___s_AESA_Radar_Development#.Wj5urd9l_IV Mesajı Paylaş
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S. Korea to scrap long-range military radar development project


South Korea's defense authorities decided Tuesday to ditch a program to develop a fixed long-range radar system against North Korea's aircraft.

The Defense Acquisition Program Administration (DAPA) signed a contract with LIG Nex1, a local defense firm, for an indigenous radar to replace the aged Air Force ones established largely on hilltops. But the radar developed by the company failed in an operational test in 2014.

"Multiple defects were found in the test and a violation of contract terms was also detected," DAPA said, summarizing the results of the 108th arms acquisition project committee presided over by Defense Minister Song Young-moo. The agency said it will reconsider the related project from square one, meaning both the domestic development of a system and importing it are options.

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2017/12/26/0200000000AEN20171226009400315.html Mesajı Paylaş
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Missiles of South Korea


Precision strike has taken on a critical role in South Korean military doctrine in recent years. Two central Republic of Korea (ROK) strategies - "Kill Chain" and "Korea Massive Punishment and Retaliation" (KMPR) - rely heavily on precision-guided munitions and surveillance to detect, preempt, and/or retaliate against a North Korean attack. These strategies work in tandem with the emerging Korea Air and Missile Defense (KAMD) architecture, which seeks to protect military assets and minimize South Korean casualties.

Kill Chain is South Korea's detection and preemptive strike doctrine. ROK intelligence and surveillance assets constantly monitor the military and political environment in North Korea. Should a DPRK attack become apparent, Kill Chain calls for the employment of strike assets to destroy North Korea's nuclear, missile, and long-range artillery facilities. To contain further escalation, Kill Chain does not seek to induce regime change in the North.

KMPR is a retaliatory variant of Kill Chain, likely to be executed after a North Korean nuclear attack or significant conventional strike. In addition to targeting North Korea's nuclear, missile, and long-range artillery facilities, KMPR includes the additional mission of decapitating North Korean political and military leadership to prompt regime change.

While a ground war with the North would likely follow, it is largely recognized that the opening hours of conflict in the Peninsula would be of immense importance, and it is during this time that ROK missiles and missile defenses would be most active.

Outside of the ROK-DPRK paradigm, South Korea's missile program may also provide an anti-access area denial (A2/AD) framework against possible Chinese aggression. Although South Korean officials have been optimistic about its relationship with a rising China, this could change. Provocative Chinese action in the South and East China Seas, economic sanctions against ROK companies in response to THAAD deployments, China's political and economic support for North Korea, or other triggers may negatively impact South Korea's relationship with China. ROK's sophisticated missile forces, as such, may prove an important hedge against future threats.





A Note on 'Hyunmoo' Naming Conventions

The NHK missile family includes: NHK-1, NHK-2, NHK-2A, NHK-2B, and NHK-2C. The missiles are more commonly known as 'Hyunmoo,' although analysts differ in their Hyunmoo missile designations: some start the 'Hyunmoo-1' designation with the NHK-1, whereas others do so with the NHK-2. In order to minimize confusion, Missile Threat designates the first two variants according to their NHK names, and starts using the Hyunmoo designation for the NHK-2A.
https://missilethreat.csis.org/country/south-korea/ Mesajı Paylaş
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